Last edited by Kazrakinos
Tuesday, July 14, 2020 | History

7 edition of African Merchants of the Indian Ocean found in the catalog.

African Merchants of the Indian Ocean

Swahili of the East African Coast

by John Middleton

  • 287 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by Waveland Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Sociology,
  • Social Science,
  • History - General History,
  • Swahili-speaking peoples,
  • Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural,
  • Africa - Central,
  • Africa - East,
  • Civilization,
  • Ethnic identity,
  • History,
  • Social life and customs,
  • History / Africa / East,
  • Anthropology - Cultural,
  • Africa, East,
  • Merchants

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages134
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8751832M
    ISBN 101577663144
    ISBN 109781577663140

    African merchants, with the help of local rulers, captured Africans to be enslaved. They then deliv-ered them to the Europeans in exchange for gold, guns, and other goods. As the slave trade grew, some African rulers voiced their opposition to the prac-tice. Nonetheless, the slave trade steadily grew. Lured by its profits, many African.   African rulers of India: That part of our history we choose to forget. The elite status of the African slaves in India ensured that a number of them had access to political authority and secrets which they could make use of to become rulers in their own right, reigning over parts of India.

    It should be emphasized that this Portuguese “monopoly” was first and foremost a monopoly between the Indian Ocean trade and Europe, not a monopoly of trade within the Indian Ocean itself (despite the best efforts of the Portuguese). Indian, African, and Middle Eastern merchants continued to exchange goods and wealth whose value greatly. The Indian Ocean Trade began with small trading settlements around A.D., and ended in the s when Portugal invaded and tried to run the trade for its own profit. As trade intensified between Africa and Asia, powerful city-states flourished along the eastern coast of Size: 1MB.

    Indian Ocean Trade (whose various trade routes are sometimes collectively called the Monsoon Marketplace) has been a key factor in East–West exchanges throughout distance trade in dhows and proas made it a dynamic zone of interaction between peoples, cultures, and civilizations stretching from Java in the East to Zanzibar and Mombasa in the West. Graeco-Roman Merchants in the Indian Ocean. Revealing a Multicultural Trade.


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African Merchants of the Indian Ocean by John Middleton Download PDF EPUB FB2

With great care the case is made of a society along the east African coast as being a well-established one long before the return of the Arabs, Persians, and other cultural groups to the region who interacted with this Bantu-influenced culture of traders, merchants, farmers who plied the waters of the Indian Ocean up and down the by:   African Merchants of the Indian Ocean book.

Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. From the back of the book:This new monograph /5. African Merchants African Merchants of the Indian Ocean book the Indian Ocean: Swahili of the East African Coast - Kindle edition by Middleton, John. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading African Merchants of the Indian Ocean: Swahili of the East African Coast/5(2).

African Merchants of the Indian Ocean: Swahili of the East African Coast (Book) Book Details. ISBN. Title. African Merchants of the Indian Ocean: Swahili of the East African Coast. Author. John Middleton. Publisher. Waveland Pr Inc. Publication Date. Buy. Get this from a library.

African merchants of the Indian Ocean: Swahili of the East African Coast. [John Middleton] -- "This new monograph serves as an authoritative introduction to an unusual people of eastern Africa known as Swahili. Middleton, who has known these people for a.

Ocean of Trade offers an innovative study of trade, production and consumption across the Indian Ocean between the years and Focusing on the Vāniyā merchants of Diu and Daman, Pedro Machado explores the region's entangled histories of exchange, including the African demand for large-scale textile production among weavers in Gujarat, the distribution of ivory to/5(3).

“As late as the 19th and 20th centuries, Islam continued to animate a whole series of intermediate networks from one end to the Indian Ocean to the other” (Lombard, pp. Several authors study these Muslim merchants: Hadramis, Gujaratis, Ismailis, Bohras, Kashmiris, Panthay, and so on.

The book underscores the centrality of Bania merchants and Gujarati textiles in the Mozambique-based maritime trade of the southwestern Indian Ocean. Cotton textile from Gujarat, Machado argues, served as a currency in the East African economies, and all commercial transactions were mediated by : Ghulam A.

Nadri. Part 1 of our Swahili Coast articles mainly discussed the role of Arab and Persian merchants in East African the Indian Ocean was an integrated whole, with extensive trade among all peoples on the s from India appear in the archaeological record from as early as the 7th century AD, and trade colonies of Indian merchants are well-attested by the year Indian Ocean with large colonies of Indian merchants were Mocha5 and Aden in Yemen, Massawa and Berberah on the African coast of the Red Sea.

By the end of the eighteenth century, the East African emporium of Zanzibar also had a small but rapidly growing colony of Indian merchants. In the Persian Gulf, Bahrain has been the seat of anCited by: Despite some disruption and restructuring due to the arrival of Portuguese, Spanish, and Dutch merchants, existing trade networks in the Indian Ocean continued to flourish and included intra-Asian trade and Asian merchants.

Indian Ocean Asian merchants: Swahili Arabs, Omanis, Gujaratis, Javanese; Indian Ocean Trade Podcasts. In highlighting the critical role of particular South Asian merchant networks, the book reveals how local African and Indian consumption was central to the development of commerce across the Indian Ocean, giving rise to a wealth of regional and global exchange in a period commonly perceived to be increasingly dominated by European company and.

The Indian Ocean Trade Instructions: Your group is a trading company in the year The merchants working for the company are from East Africa and Asia.

The object of the simulation is to make as much profit as you can by traveling back and forth across the Indian Ocean and conducting trade between Asian and African kingdoms.

African Merchants of the Indian Ocean: Swahili of the East African Coast / Edition 1 available in Paperback. Add to Wishlist. ISBN ISBN Pub.

Date: 11/07/ Publisher: Waveland Press, Inc. Publish your book with B&N. Learn More. The B&N Mastercard® Price: $ The intersection of Islam (which emerges in the seventh century in western Arabia) and the African Diaspora in the Indian Ocean world may be seen in the life of Bilal Ibn Rabbah (“the Ethiopian”), Islam’s first mu’azzin (caller to prayer).

Born into slavery in Mecca to an African mother and an Arab father, Bilal heard first-hand. The Indian Ocean ports had long been active trading centers for Persian, Arabic, Indian and some European merchants.

These merchants brought their languages, culture and religion to the region. For example, Ibn Battuta found that Mogadishu's sultan spoke both his native Somali and some Arabic and his chief legal advisor was Egyptian.

Maritime history of Somalia refers to the seafaring tradition of the Somali people. It includes various stages of Somali navigational technology, shipbuilding and design, as well as the history of the Somali port cities. It also covers the historical sea routes taken by Somali sailors which sustained the commercial enterprises of the historical Somali kingdoms and empires, in addition to the.

Ocean of Trade: South Asian Merchants, Africa and the Indian Ocean, c. Pedro Machado. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ISBN: It is perhaps banal to point out that the Indian Ocean World (IOW) has not received the amount. The Indian Ocean is the third-largest of the world's oceanic divisions, cover, km 2 (27, sq mi) or % of the water on the Earth's surface.

It is bounded by Asia to the north, Africa to the west, and Australia to the east. To the south it is bounded by the Southern Ocean or Antarctica, depending on the definition in use. Along its core, the Indian Ocean has some large Average depth: 3, m (12, ft).

My first book, Ocean of Trade thus examined the multiple dynamics of Vāniyās, South Asian merchants with network headquarters in Diu and Daman in Gujarat in western India, in connecting local and regional commercial systems in South Asia, and East and Southeast Africa with rapidly intensifying global systems of material, social and cultural.

Strengthened by climate change, the Indian Ocean Dipole has made Australia drier while countries such as Kenya, Somalia and Ethiopia become wetter and more hospitable to desert locusts. Date The Siddi (pronounced [sɪd̪d̪iː]), also known as Sidi, Siddhi, Sheedi, or Habshi, are an ethnic group inhabiting India and s are descended from the Bantu peoples of the East African region.

Some were merchants, sailors, indentured servants, slaves and mercenaries. The Siddi community is currently estimated at aro–60, individuals, with Karnataka, Gujarat and Gujarat: 8,Demand for West African gold was at its height as the economies of the Mediterranean Sea, the Middle East, Central Asia, the Indian Ocean and Ming China expanded [In addition], the rise of the Malian and then the Songhay empires [made] the trade routes and trading cities of the African continent relatively secure, and therefore prosperous.".